#OnRepeat: I am a missing planet


I am a missing planet
You know me from my orbit
From my effect on others
the way I make them spin off centre
moving in marvelous ways
Unseen treasure crossing your sky
Think on where I am not
then you will know where I’ll be
Expect me when you see me
I’m waiting to be discovered

The Black Panther Movement is part of Black British History too


Media Diversified

by Amber Fletcher

The Black Panthers are well-known for their fight against racist oppression in America, but the importance of their work was not limited to the US. Their commitment to equality for black lives inspired black people around the world to stand up for their rights, including here in the UK.

With that in mind you’d expect that an influential documentary on the Black Panthers would have had some media attention. Strangely enough, though, it’s gone completely un-promoted, so let me make the case.

You might think the Black Panthers are outdated, or just an American answer to an American problem. But consider black victims of police brutality, the barriers faced by black academics and the lack of provision for high rates of mental illness in black communities in the UK today. We are organising now, as we always have, but we need to engage with our history.

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10 things I hate about me


I hate my stupid poker face that won’t show people how i feel, 

because I’ve spent my life telling people “I’m fine”, it’s natural for me to conceal.

I hate the fact I’m 6 foot one, not normal and not tall,
And I can’t buy anything cool in my size till the sales in the spring and fall.

I hate being allergic to half the menu in any decent restaurant,
You’ll get bored with the places i can eat and i can’t​ take you where you want.

I hate my awkward eyebrows
I hate my stupid grin
I hate the way i nod my head

I hate that it makes​ people think I listen

I hate the way anything that’s ever gone wrong never leaves my head.

I hate the fact my mind is too full for positives​ instead.

I hate the fact you’ll never know that guy who met your eye,

Because all the things I hate about me stopped me from coming over and saying “Hi”

Traditionally Caribbean:


In collaboration with Caribbean Faces Traditionally Caribbean: The Sitting Room “The ‘sitting room’ is an inherently Caribbean phenomenon, if you were privileged enough to have a …

Source: Traditionally Caribbean:

1,000 words | The Supreme Court’s Judgment in Miller


In this 1,000 words post I explain the key points decided by the UK Supreme Court in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5. I have written a separate, longer,…

Source: 1,000 words | The Supreme Court’s Judgment in Miller

Brexit means Brexit: how do those who voted Leave and Remain feel now?


Brexit means Brexit: how do those who voted Leave and Remain feel now?

My submission is at the bottom – Smiley, 31 from London

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/03/brexit-means-brexit-how-do-those-who-voted-leave-and-remain-feel-now?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_WordPress

What is Manhood (Rujūlah)?


Splendid Pearls

Image Courtesy of Time4Thinkers

The definition of manhood (Rujūlah) has been endlessly discussed and dissected in scholarly tomes. For many ancient cultures, manhood was rooted in being a warrior. But it was a battlefield-specific manhood ill-prepared for life during peacetime. In early American history, manhood was connected with being a yeoman farmer or independent artisan. But when the Industrial Revolution moved men from farm to factory, men wondered if true manliness was possible in the absence of the economic independence they once enjoyed. In the 20th century, manhood meant being the familial breadwinner. But during times of Depression and Recession, and when women joined the workforce in great numbers, men felt deeply emasculated.

When manhood is connected to such cultural, and ultimately ephemeral guideposts, and times change, a crisis of manhood results. Some men then cling stubbornly to a past that cannot be recreated while others seek to redefine manliness in ways that while well-intentioned, end…

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First 1000 words of “The End of the Garden”


Since I was last posting I went through a series of Depressive Episodes before I found a regimen of therapy, meditation and supplements that helped. I’ve managed to go a couple of months without SERIOUS suicidal thoughts – actually considering the means etc. I have the odd few death wish thoughts but the’re relatively mild.

In other news I attended a discovery day for new authors held at Foyles, Charing Cross Road where Literary Agents Curtis Brown did a meet, greet and read for authors. The line was through the door and there were timed slots all through the day. I gave them the first three pages of my novel and they loved it. I need to try and get it finished this year and then submit it. They’ve given me a name to submit to so I’m now very motivated to think, act and plan as a writer rather than as a wannabe.

So pleased to present the beginning  of “The End of the Garden” by Yusuf (Smiley) Yearwood. (1st novel on backburner, 2nd novel cooking nicely) Continue reading