Every day with a “Why?” in it! (Freewriting)


Sunday afternoon -The dark tea time of the soul (h/t Douglas Adams) Let the random ruminations begin!

Hugo stared at the wall daring it to be anything but what it was. Unyielding, unchanging, uninteresting. It did not alter or shift. Neither did the Djinn rune written in an ink no pure human could read.

Library.

There was no option but to do this the Djinn way. He felt his body undulate and lose weight. It felt like falling asleep but not nearly as comforting.  Anyone lucky or unlucky enough to have been watching him at that moment would have seen him appear to fade into near nothingness, a ghost image. That ghost then appeared to walk through the wall. 

The manner of why this can be is quite tedious to explain.

Continue reading

Writing 101 Day 6: Allow me to introduce “Muse”


For the sake of preserving her blushes I will call my muse, “Muse” for that is her status

How is it possible to be so sharp-eyed and yet have such a soft gaze.

I heard a comedian say once that what a woman wants to hear from her husband is her own thoughts in a mans voice.

When Muse speaks, its like my soul is talking to me in a woman’s voice. Muse tells me things about myself and I’ll listen and I’ll reflect and what she says just seems to be so obviously true I’ll wonder how I could ever have thought otherwise. Continue reading

#OnRepeat – Born Again


So everything’s getting better, feeling better, looking better. The prayers are kicking in, the advice is kicking in, the supplements are kicking in. Damn it even the weather is kicking in.

62129

OK, I’m exaggerating. F*ck English weather!

Continue reading

Erase/ Rewind


Things came to a stop with my novel “Hugo Reyes” when I realised I was censoring myself. I realised that as open and flowing as the story was it wasn’t going in the direction I wanted. I decided to stop denying myself the fantasy and Sci-fi elements in the background or I would just end up rewriting the Bourne Identity! ✋
Continue reading

Advice from G. Willow Wilson


image

23 Of The Most Beautiful Terry Pratchett Quotes To Remember Him By


Rest in Peace Sir Terry. You are, were and will continue to be an inspiration.

23 Of The Most Beautiful Terry Pratchett Quotes To Remember Him By.

 

 

Week off, Week on


Week off of my day job and a week on my first novel.

Yes, that’s right I’ve taken a week off work to do some serious work on my novel. My target for this week is to get at least 50 pages down and then keep going. I’m treating this week like Rabbit in 8 mile getting ready to flip the script.

I’ll post updates and other writing as I go. To be honest I needed to this since January but I think after these last three blogging events I’m ready to write.

 

8mile-7

Writing 201: Future – What Took You So Long?


“Could it be our last prompt word of Writing 201: Poetry? Already?! Let’s keep our spirits up by focusing on whatever it is that’s coming next. Whether it’s about tomorrow, next October, or the year 2345, let today’s poem be inspired by your vision of the future. (Fears, hopes, and plans are equally acceptable, of course. So are robots and hoverboards.)

You didn’t think we’d end a poetry course without a single word on (arguably) the most iconic form of them all — the sonnet? From Petrarch to Shakespeare to Lorca to Heaney, it’s a form that’s has endured dozens of vogues, backlashes, and comebacks — it will bury us all. It will outlive the cockroaches.

In some ways, the sonnet is easy: you get 14 lines of verse, usually grouped into four stanzas of 4-4-3-3 lines each (alternatively: two groupings of eight and six lines, respectively). Sonnets used to be written in metered verse (like alexandrines in French and iambic pentameter in English, for example), but many modern poets forego the meter altogether, or at least don’t use it consistently. Sonnets also tended to be written using any number of established rhyming schemes (for example, Shakespeare’s abab cdcd efef gg), but that, too, is no longer a formal requirement. (If you’re a sonnet purist, or the ghost of Shakespeare, please forgive me!)

The last device we’ll explore together in this course is one of my favorites — the chiasmus (key-AHS-mus). At its simplest, a chiasmus is essentially a reversal, an inverted crossing (it got its name from the greek letter chi – X). How can we use it? Let Snoop Dogg show us the way: Laid back, with my mind on my money and my money on my mind”  https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_assignment/writing-201-future/ ”

What Took You So Long?

I wish I was there to kiss and love you, my lover not yet kissed
and tell you you’re the coolness of my crying eyes
We could drive all night joy in our car, pretend we’re teenagers joyriding
and stop on Primrose Hill to watch Saturday fall and Sunday rise Continue reading

Writing 201: Fingers – The shock of the pen


“Sure, eyes are expressive. But there’s so much more we can do with our fingers — today’s word prompt — from opening a gift and plucking a guitar to signing words and waving goodbye. If you want to go beyond actual digits, you could write about any finger-shaped object you find interesting, or about something that comes into frequent contact with your fingers: a ring, your keyboard, a glove.

Today’s suggested form might sound like an oxymoron: the prose poem. Unlike some of the other forms we experimented with — say, the limerick — a prose poem, by definition, has no fixed rules. Whether a reader sees the prose or the poetry in it hinges on a variety of factors beyond your control.

We’ve tackled alliteration last week — the strategic repetition of consonants in close proximity to each other. Today, let’s give assonance a try. It’s the same thing, only with vowels.

Assonance is subtler than alliteration, but can have a profound cumulative effect on a poem, especially when the repeated sound resonates somehow with the topic you’re writing about.”

 (Written with Eminem’s rapping style in mind)

Today’s poem has been guest blogged on Harsh Reality!

What Happens When (Virtually) No One Buys Your Book — Medium


Sobering reading for the aspiring / self-published author but truth be told this is something I knew about – the possibility, nay certainty of commercial failure. Indeed for most of my life its been a belief that failure as a writer is certain that has kept me from trying. You think to yourself:

“it ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate son”

Writing with my eyes open…

What Happens When (Virtually) No One Buys Your Book — Medium.